Tag-Archive for » poem «

25
Jan

I often watch my daughter and wonder – What are her thoughts? What does she really think and feel about the life she has been dealt? There are many times I cry myself to sleep, praying for a miracle – if only …

She has inspired a lot of my poetry. With the heart of a warrior, she takes life one day at a time. Often times, she shares her desires that we could afford to travel some, not a lot, just to give her some taste of the world. It breaks my heart.

I thought I would share this poem “I Watch” with my viewers. While it does not compare to the reality of our situation, it does give a glimmer view into our world. Some things in life, for as powerful as words are, words just simply cannot convey- so here is our small glimmer view: I WATCH

Alliteration is the repetition of the same sounds at the beginning of words or stressed syllables.

For example, the tongue twister “Suzie sells sea shells by the seashore” uses alliteration.

In modern usage, alliteration is most commonly consonantal.

24
Jan

Assonance is the repetition of an identical or similar vowel sound.

The “ee” sound in the sentence “See the bees” is an example of assonance.

Here’s an example poem that uses the “I” sound repetition:

I have a hive

it’s there I thrive

it’s where I hide

my time I bide

to go outside

collect I might

honey to mine

from pollen inside

While it’s not a great poem it give you a general idea of this type poem.

The heroic couplet is an English form that is commonly used in epic and narrative poetry.

It is a poem constructed entirely through rhyming couplets written in iambic pentameter.

These couplets tend to be closed, rather than enjambed.  The heroic couplet  gained its popularity during the 18th century.

The elegy was originally written for elegiac meter.

Traditional elegiac meter is a dactylic hexameter followed by pentameter.

Unlike a eulogy that focuses on the death of someone, the elegy can be a poem of sad, reflective, or a somber tone.

19
Jan

One of the Japanese forms of poetry, the haiku is a short poem of three lines.

The first line  using five syllables,  seven syllables in the second line, and five syllables in the third line.  It does not rhyme and is nature oriented.

In an acrostic poem, the first letter of each line in the poem works together to spell a word, usually the title of the poem.  It may or may not rhyme:

FATHER
Fortitude of strength
Armor of protection
Tempered attitude
Helping hands
Encouraging us
Rewards of love.
©2006 Written/Copyrights Retained By: O’Della Wilson AKA Alhavakia

If you haven’t visited lately, there have been several recent poems added to the site. With poems that aspire to inspire or poems about overcoming life challenges or simply make you smile, there’s a poem here that should meet your taste and place a footprint on your soul.

Please grab a drink, relax, and start reading a poem or two. If you enjoy what you read (I’m sure you will), bookmark this site now before you forget. And don’t forget to tell your friends, family, co-workers and everyone else you know about this site.

All comments are appreciated, thank you for your time today.

You might also enjoy my Answers, Information, and Resources site: TheGoSeeGirl

An abecedarian is an alphabetic acrostic.

Rather than spelling out the title, each line begins with a word beginning with the next successive line in the alphabet.  For example, if the first line begins with “A” then the second line would begin with a word starting with the letter “B”.

Watch for the next post coming in the near future. And if you haven’t visited lately, make sure to check out the recent additions to the poetry pages. There’s something for everyone.

Thanks and have a great week.

I have added lots of poems for your enjoyment recently. Several are very personal to me, but all were written with love. Whatever your taste in poetry, you should find something here that appeals to  your liking. More will be added in the near future.

Each poem is listed individually, on its own page, under the section “Published Pages” on the right sidebar column.

Also, if there is enough interest, I will be posting some valuable information about the types of poetry, as well as some terms/terminology you should be familiar with if you are interested in writing poetry.

Do you have an opinion about a particular poem you read on this site? Please share your opinions with other visitors of this site, as well as the author. All feedback is appreciated and valued.